Sin city, Kabuki Cho, Shinjuku

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Kabukicho is the notorious R.L.D, red light district, of Tokyo. But no worries as there is plenty of other entertainment that is more PG rated.
Kabukichō is the location of many host (usually called by my western friends as a male talking- prostitute. lol) and hostess (usually called by my western friends as a female talking- prostitute) bars, shops, restaurants, and nightclubs, and is often referred to as the sleepless town.
No matter what day of the week, Kabukicho is bustling.
The famous Robot restaurant is also located here as well as the godzilla statue, which watches over Shinjuku.
Kabukicho gained notoriety for its connection to the Yakuza. This causes many people to believe that the area was very dangerous. However, this is not the case.
Although many hosts and hostess line the streets and try to pull you into their stores, as a foreigner walking through the area you have nothing to worry about.
Just make sure if you are going into any clubs that it is a legitimate establishment and not going to rip you off. Do not follow any street fishers. If you did, you will end up to pay
$2000 at least for just a couple of beers and snacks.
Why don't you just take some time to stroll through and admire the neon lights.


Grab a drink at Golden Gai


One the most prominent drinking spots in Kabukicho, the only fees you have to worry about here are the seating ones (which range from 0 to ¥1,000) so you can rest easy.
There are around 300 places to choose from packed into these alleys, so you can enjoy the wandering as much as your drinks! The tiny bars usually only seat single digits,
so big groups may have to split up.
Some favorites include Albatross and Hair of the Dog, the latter of which is a rock bar with no seating charge that plays constant concert DVDs at request.
The bars all have their own style and atmosphere, making a bar crawl a way more interesting prospect than your usual experience!
Seating charges are clearly marked on doors (along with some that have signs saying Japanese only--which is more about keeping spots for regulars than rudeness)
and you can peek in to see if it tickles your fancy!